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Information for International Travelers
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Travel & Transportation   >  Information for International Travelers


The San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium is truly an international symposium.   The contributions of attendees and presenters from many different countries are highly valued.   We hope that you will act promptly to help us assure that this can continue. Advanced planning can smooth the visa application process for you.

Recent reports indicate that it could take anywhere from 3 to 8 months to obtain a visa.   If you are traveling to the symposium from outside the United States, it is vital that you start the process of obtaining your visa as early as possible.   If you require a letter of invitation, please contact the Symposium office.

Please refer to the U.S. Department of State notices and links below for the most current visa and entrance information.   Further information can be obtained at the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs, and Visa Services web page.

Symposium badges will be mailed to pre-registrants in Fall 2013. Upon arrival at the Symposium, please present your badge at the “PRE-REGISTERED” desk in the convention center (Bridge Hall) in order to receive Symposium materials and badge holder.

Important Passport Information

Due to new security rules this year requiring U.S. citizens to carry passports when traveling by air from Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean or Bermuda, the average time to process a routine passport application is from four to six weeks, according to the State Department. Expedited service, which costs more, is from two to three weeks. The period from February to April is traditionally the busiest time for passport services as Americans plan their spring and summer trips.  For tips on applying for a U.S. passport, click here.

 

Please refer to the link below for the most updated information:

http://www.travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis_pa_tw_2223.html

The Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI) requires U.S. citizens and nonimmigrant aliens from Canada, Bermuda, and Mexico departing from or entering the United States by air, land or sea ports-of-entry to have WHTI compliant documents. Review the following information to learn about document requirements to enter the U.S.:

Before you travel, make sure you know the entry requirements of the country you plan to visit. See Country Specific Information for more information on the country you are traveling to. The goal of WHTI is to strengthen U.S. border security while facilitating entry for U.S. citizens and legitimate foreign visitors by providing standardized documentation that enables the Department of Homeland Security to quickly and reliably identify a traveler.

Please refer to the link below for the most updated information:

http://www.travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis_pa_tw_2223.html

Before you travel, learn the entry requirements of the foreign country you are traveling to.


Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative Passport Requirements
Returning to the U.S. From
Type of Travel
Document Required
Any International Location
Travel by air
Air
Commercial airplane, private airplane, etc.
U.S. Passport Book
Canada, Mexico, Bermuda or the
Caribbean Region
Travel by Land
Land
Car, bus, train, by foot, etc.
U.S. Passport Book or Card
Canada, Mexico, Bermuda or the
Caribbean Region
Travel by sea
Sea
Commercial cruise line, private boat, etc
U.S. Passport Book or Card
A U.S. Territory
Travel by Air, Land or Sea
Air, Land or Sea
Valid Photo ID


The U.S. Department of Homeland Security will allow certain groups of travelers to re-enter the United States without a U.S. passport, like members of the military and certain supervised groups of children. WHTI travel requirements for these groups and the general public can be found at www.GetYouHome.gov.

Windows Media logo Watch our video about the Passport Card and the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative

The following summarizes information available on the Department of Homeland Security's website:

ABOUT WHTI

The Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative is a result of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (IRTPA), requiring all travelers to present a passport or other document that denotes identity and citizenship when entering the United States.

The goal of WHTI is to strengthen U.S. border security while facilitating entry for U.S. citizens and legitimate foreign visitors by providing standardized documentation that enables the Department of Homeland Security to quickly and reliably identify a traveler.

Federal Regulations

Other Relevant Links

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Current Visa Processing Situation

Visa applications are now subject to a greater degree of scrutiny than in the past. For many applicants, a personal appearance interview is required as a standard part of visa processing. Additionally, applicants affected by these procedures are informed of the need for additional screening at the time they submit their applications and are being advised to expect delays. The time needed for adjudication of individual cases will continue to be difficult to predict. For travelers, the need for an interview will mean additional coordination with the embassy or consulate is needed to schedule an interview appointment. We recommend that individuals build in ample time before their planned travel date when seeking to obtain a visa.

"We recognize that these delays are having an impact on visa applicants, and we have already had success streamlining the process, consistent with our security and legal responsibilities. The State Department is working hard with other government agencies to rationalize clearance procedures in ways that continue to protect US borders, our first priority, while facilitating legitimate travel.

We trust that affected applicants will understand that this waiting period is necessary as we strive to make every effort to ensure the safety and security of the United States for all who are here, including foreign visitors."

April, 2007

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Special Visa Processing Procedures

Please refer to the link below for the most updated information:

http://travel.state.gov/visa/temp/info/info_1300.html

There are special procedures related  to the issuance of visas to foreign citizen  from countries designated as State Sponsors of Terrorism, under provisions of the Enhanced Border Security and Visa Reform Act of 2002 (EBSVRA). Four countries, including Cuba, Syria, Sudan and Iran are impacted by these procedures.

All applicants from State Sponsors of Terrorism countries age 16 and over, irrespective of gender, appear for an interview with a consular officer. An exception to the requirement for an interview may be made at the discretion of the consular officer in cases of A and G visa applicants (except for A-3 and G-5 applicants, who must be interviewed).

The Law - Enhanced Border Security and Visa Reform Act

No nonimmigrant visa under Section 101(a)(15) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)) shall be issued to any alien from a country that is a state sponsor of international terrorism unless the Secretary of State determines, in consultation with the Attorney General and the heads of other appropriate United States agencies, that such alien does not pose a threat to the safety or national security of the United States. In making a determination under this sub-section, the Secretary of State shall apply standards developed by the Secretary of State, in consultation with the Attorney General and the heads of other appropriate United States; agencies, that are applicable to the nationals of such states.

Frequently Asked Questions

For more information regarding visa applications from State Sponsors of Terrorism countries please view our Frequently Asked Questions.

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Visa Waiver Program

Please refer to the link below for the most updated information:

 

http://travel.state.gov/visa/temp/without/without_1990.html

Important Notices:

Taiwan: On October 2, 2012, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Napolitano announced the designation of Taiwan into the Visa Waiver Program (VWP). Eligible Taiwan passport holders can travel on the VWP beginning November 1, 2012, but may apply for travel authorization approval through the Electronic System for Travel Authorization beginning immediately.


Overview – What is the Visa Waiver Program?

The Visa Waiver Program (VWP) enables nationals of 36 participating countries to travel to the United States for tourism or business (visitor [B] visa purposes only) for stays of 90 days or less without obtaining a visa. The program was established to eliminate unnecessary barriers to travel, stimulating the tourism industry, and permitting the Department of State to focus consular resources in other areas. VWP eligible travelers may apply for a visa, if they prefer to do so. Nationals of VWP countries must meet eligibility requirements to travel without a visa on VWP, and therefore, some travelers from VWP countries are not eligible to use the program. VWP travelers are required to have a valid authorization through the Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) prior to travel, are screened at the port of entry into the United States, and are enrolled in the Department of Homeland Security’s US-VISIT program.

Which countries participate in the Visa Waiver Program (VWP)?

Currently, 37 countries participate in the Visa Waiver Program, as shown below:

Andorra
Hungary
New Zealand
Australia
Iceland
Norway
Austria
Ireland
Portugal
Belgium
Italy
San Marino
Brunei
Japan
Singapore
Czech Republic
Latvia
Slovakia
Denmark
Liechtenstein
Slovenia
Estonia
Lithuania
South Korea
Finland
Luxembourg
Spain
France
Malta
Sweden
Germany
Monaco
Switzerland
Greece
the Netherlands
Taiwan (see note below)
   
United Kingdom

Note: Eligible Taiwan passport holders may begin traveling to the United States without visas under the Visa Waiver Program beginning on November 1, 2012.

How does a country qualify to participate in the Visa Waiver Program (VWP)?

To be admitted to the Visa Waiver Program, a country must meet various security and other requirements, such as enhanced law enforcement and security-related data sharing with the United States and timely reporting of both blank and issued lost and stolen passports. VWP members are also required to maintain high counterterrorism, law enforcement, border control, and document security standards.

In addition, designation as a VWP country is at the discretion of the United States government. Meeting the objective requirements of the VWP does not guarantee a successful candidacy for VWP membership.

Which travelers may use the Visa Waiver Program to enter the United States?

Review this VWP Quick Reference Guide (for new member countries) and make sure you review this webpage for detailed information. Nationals of the 36 countries participating in the Visa Waiver Program may use VWP if:

  • They have received an authorization to travel under the VWP through the Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA
  • They present the appropriate type of passport valid for six months past their expected stay in the United States (unless country-specific agreements provide exemptions). This is a requirement in addition to other passport requirements for all categories of passports -- regular, diplomatic, and official - when the traveler is seeking to enter the United States for business or tourist purposes, for a maximum of 90 days;
  • The purpose of their stay in the United States is 90 days or less for tourism or business (Visitor (B) visa) purpose of travel. (If in doubt, travelers should check with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate to verify that what they plan to do is considered tourism or business.) Transit through the United States is generally permitted.
    Important Notice: Foreign media representatives planning to engage in that vocation in the United States are not eligible for VWP travel, as the purpose of their stay does not qualify as “business”. These professionals must obtain a nonimmigrant media (I) visa. Note also that travelers planning to work or study cannot travel on VWP, and they must obtain the appropriate visa to travel to the United States Learn More.
  • If arriving by air or sea, they are traveling on an approved carrier (See the approved carriers list) and have a return trip ticket to any foreign destination;
  • They can demonstrate the intent to stay 90 days or less in the United States and demonstrate sufficient funds to support themselves while in the United States. Learn more on the CBP website.

VWP travelers who have been admitted under the Visa Waiver Program and who make a short trip to Canada, Mexico or an adjacent island generally can be readmitted to the United States under the VWP for the balance of their original admission period. See the Department of Homeland Security’s Customs and Border Protection (CBP) website for additional details. Also VWP nationals resident in Mexico, Canada or adjacent islands are generally exempted from requirements to show onward travel to other foreign destinations. Learn more at the CBP website.

When does a national of a VWP country need to apply for a visa instead of using the VWP?

Nationals of VWP countries must meet the guidelines listed in the section above in order to seek admission to the United States under the Visa Waiver Program. Travelers who do not meet these guidelines must apply for a visa.

A visa must be requested if the traveler:

  • Wants to remain in the United States for longer than 90 days, or envisions that they may wish to change their status (from tourism to student, etc.) once in the United States;
  • Wants to work or study in the United States, travel as a working foreign media representative, come to the United States for other purposes not allowed on a visitor visa, or intends to immigrate to the United States;
  • Is a national of the Czech Republic, Estonia, Greece, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, the Republic of Korea, or the Slovak Republic AND DOES NOT HAVE an electronic passport with an integrated chip;
  • Is a national of one of the VWP countries not listed above AND DOES NOT have a machine-readable passport (MRP)(depending on the date the MRP was issued, renewed, or extended, it may also need to contain a digital photograph or an integrated electronic chip);
  • Intends to travel by private aircraft or other non-VWP approved air or sea carriers to the United States. Click here to see the approved carriers list;
  • Has a criminal record or other condition making them ineligible for a visa (see Classes of Aliens Ineligible for Visas).
  • Has been refused admission to the United States before, or did not comply with the conditions of previous VWP admissions (90 days or less stay for tourism or business, etc.).

I was denied a visa on a recent visa application, may I use the VWP?

A recent visa denial for any reason could result in denial of an authorization via ESTA, additional questioning at the port of entry, or denial of admission to the United States. Applicants who are uncertain of whether they qualify for VWP travel may choose to apply for a visa.

What do I need to enter the United States under the VWP?

To request entry into the United States under the Visa Waiver Program, travelers must meet the requirements listed in Which travelers may enter the United States using the Visa Waiver Program?. Each VWP traveler must present his/her own valid passport of the appropriate type. See What do I need to know about VWP machine-readable passport (MRP) and e-Passport?, What is a machine-readable passport (MRP)? and What is an e-Passport? for additional details. VWP travelers must also have an authorization through the Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA and, may be required to present a completed and signed I-94W Nonimmigrant Visa Waiver Arrival-Departure Record to U.S. officials at the port of entry depending on the airline (DHS is in the process of eliminating the paper form). I-94W forms are free and often provided by travel agents, airlines or cruise ships prior to arrival, but may be picked up and completed on arrival at the U.S. port of entry. Travelers may also be asked to provide evidence of onward travel or other documentation on the purpose of their stay in the United States. Travelers entering through land ports of entry must pay a small land border fee as prescribed in 8 CFR 103.7(b)(1).

What do I need to know about VWP machine-readable passport (MRP) and e-Passport requirements?

All VWP travelers, regardless of age or type of passport used, must present a machine-readable passport. In addition, depending on when VWP travelers’ passports were issued, other passport requirements apply:

  • Nationals of the Czech Republic, Estonia, Greece, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, the Republic of Korea, and the Slovak Republic require passports with an integrated chip containing the information from the data page (e-Passport).
  • Nationals of other VWP countries:
    • Machine-readable passports issued or renewed/extended on or after 10/26/06: passports must have integrated chips with information from the data page.
    • Machine-readable passports issued or renewed/extended between 10/26/05 and 10/25/06: passports must have digital photographs printed on the data page or integrated chips with information from the data page.
    • Machine-readable passports issued or renewed/extended before 10/26/05: no further requirements.

Notice: Effective July 1, 2009 all Visa Waiver Program (VWP) emergency or temporary passports must be electronic passports (e-Passports) to be eligible for travel to the United States without a visa under the VWP. This includes VWP applicants who present emergency or temporary passports to transit the United States. U.S. Customs and Border Protection may exercise discretion at the ports of entry for cases in which VWP applicants are traveling for medical or other emergency reasons. A VWP national arriving in the United States with a non-compliant passport, for other than emergency travel reasons, may be detained for further processing and/or denied admission”.

Please refer to the Visa Waiver Program Passport Requirements on the United States CBP website for additional details on passport requirements.

Passports, regardless of the type, must be valid for six months past the expected stay in the United States (unless country-specific agreements provide exemptions). This is a requirement for all categories of passports - regular, diplomatic, and official - when the traveler is seeking to enter the United States for business or tourist purposes, for a maximum of 90 days.

If you are a traveler from a VWP country and your passport does not meet these requirements, you may want to consider obtaining a new VWP-compliant passport from the passport issuing authority in your country of citizenship. Otherwise you cannot travel under VWP and you must obtain a visa in your valid passport for entry into the United States.

What is a machine-readable passport?

A machine-readable passport has certain biographical data entered on the data page in accordance with standards set by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), Doc 9303, Part 1 Machine-Readable Passports. These standards address issues such as the size of the passport and photograph, arrangement of data fields, and the two lines of printed machine-readable data that appear at the bottom of the page. Machine-readable passports can be read by scanning the two lines of printed data through special readers. Below is an example of how the biographical data page in a machine-readable passport might look:

Machine Readable Passport image

Travelers should contact their country’s passport issuing agency or authority if they have any doubts related to whether their passport is machine-readable.

What is an e-Passport (or biometric passport)?

An e-Passport incorporates data related to an individual's identity; current ICAO guidelines call for e-Passports to include facial recognition data. The contours of individuals' faces are digitally mapped and stored on the chip so that a comparison of facial data for the bearer of the passport and the facial data of the person to whom the passport was issued can be made. You can readily identify an e-Passport, because it has a unique international symbol on the cover.

e-Passport image

What should I know about machine-readable passports and family travel?

Families seeking to enter the United States under the VWP need to obtain an individual machine-readable passport for each traveler, including infants. A machine-readable passport has biographic data for only one traveler in the machine-readable zone. Because of the requirement that passport data be presented in machine-readable format, children included in family or parents' passports may be denied visa-free entry into the United States since only the primary traveler's biographic data is included in the machine-readable zone of the passport.

Entering the United States under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) – What happens at the port of entry?

Detailed information about admissions and entry to the United States under the Visa Waiver Program can be found on the DHS Customs Border Protection website at Visa Waiver Program and Admission to the United States. VWP travelers are enrolled in the DHS US-VISIT program when they arrive at U.S. ports of entry. Travelers should be aware that by requesting admission under the Visa Waiver Program, they are generally waiving their right to review or appeal a CBP officer’s decision as to their application for admission at the port of entry. Likewise, if the traveler is later found to have violated the conditions of admission under the Visa Waiver Program, they do not have the right to contest a removal order (See the CBP website for additional details.)

Is there a fee to use the Visa Waiver Program (VWP)?

There is a small land border fee for VWP travelers arriving at land ports of entry. See the CBP website for additional details.

What about Canadian, Mexican or Bermudan citizens and VWP?

Canada, Mexico and Bermuda are not participants in the Visa Waiver Program. The Immigration and Nationality Act includes other provisions for visa-free travel for nationals of Canada and Bermuda under certain circumstances. See Citizens of Canada, Mexico and Bermuda. Since they are not part of the Visa Waiver Program, VWP requirements for machine-readable or biometric passports do not apply to nationals of Canada, Mexico or Bermuda. Also, it should be noted that some nationals of Canada and Bermuda traveling to the United States require nonimmigrant visas.

How can I get additional information?

Additional information on the Visa Waiver Program is available from the Department of Homeland Security Customs and Border Protection website.


A step-by-step outline of today's U.S. visa application procedures

1.    If you have access to the Internet, visit www.UnitedStatesVisas.gov. This Web site has been created to help you find the information about current visa policy and procedures quickly and easily, based on your own situation and circumstance. Whether you are a student, a sponsor, a tourist, or a business traveler, this Web site can serve as a useful first stop on your journey.  
There are many different types of visas, and this site can help you determine which kind you need and how to obtain it. If you do not have access to the Internet, contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for further information.
2.      Make an appointment to visit the U.S. Embassy or Consulate.   Visa application procedures vary somewhat among Embassies and Consulates, depending on local needs. In most countries, you will need to make an appointment. This can be done by telephone, mail, over the Internet, or in person, depending on circumstances in your country.   Wait times for appointments may be longer than in the past.   Schedule your appointment as soon as you know you need to travel to the U.S.
 
Be sure to ask what fees are required and how they can be paid. Application fees are non-refundable and must be paid before your appointment.
3.      Get all your documentation ready. You will need:
•  A valid passport
•  Appropriate applications . These can be obtained through an Embassy or Consulate or at www.UnitedStatesVisas.gov.
•  Documents to support the application detailing employment, reason for travel and financial status
•  Proof of payment of fees

 

Remember, as in the past, the consular officer may require additional information or application forms.

 

If you are a student applying for a visa to study in the U.S., talk to the U.S. academic institution or exchange program sponsoring you to obtain all the forms you will need to present with your application.  

 

4.  Submit your application, passport, and supporting documents to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate.  

Your application will then be reviewed by the consular officer and, in many cases, by officials in Washington, D.C. For most applicants, the visa is issued within a few weeks. There is no guarantee of obtaining a visa.

 
5.  In some cases, additional reviews will be required. Your information is submitted and checked in the world's foremost security database, which includes comprehensive information drawn from both U.S. and foreign law enforcement agencies worldwide. If your name or a close variation indicates security concerns, the process will be delayed. Additional steps will vary from requests for additional interviews and information to official registration and fingerprinting.   This may add at least 4-6 weeks to the processing time.  

Registration upon arrival in the United States is mandatory in many cases but registration can be required in any case regardless of country of origin. See www.UnitedStatesVisas.gov for the most current information about who is affected by this requirement.  

6. A visa allows you to travel from your country to a port of entry in the U.S. In many cases, that port of entry will be the airport where you land. On the airplane you will be asked to complete a short arrival/departure form. When you deplane, follow directions for non-citizen entry. At the airport, a U.S. official will interview you and verify all of your paperwork.

Once admitted, you will receive an immigration stamp and proceed to baggage claim and U.S. Customs.
 
You may be informed by the consular office before leaving your country if you will be subject to special clearance procedures.  
Some travelers may be directed to private workstations in the arrivals hall, where special registration, photos and electronic (ink-less) fingerprints will be taken. Additional interviews and verification processes will also be conducted.

 

We want to ensure that the visa application process is straightforward for people who want to come to the U.S. to study, visit, and conduct business.

 

It is true that some things have changes. Recent events have required the U.S. to modify and   intensify some of its policies to ensure safety and security. As a nation, the U.S. is working harder than ever to identify and deny entry to those who mean harm to our country. Many things have not changed. The United States of America is still a nation where diversity is celebrated and people from all over the world are welcome. Today, we-like most other countries-are working to keep our borders secure while we maintain the freedom to exchange ideas, enrich lives and keep businesses thriving.

 

We hope you enjoy your visit to the U.S. We look forward to having you here.

*

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

It is important to remember that visa processing and operations can vary depending on local circumstances.  

  • Some consulates require that personal interviews and appointments be scheduled in advance, and some interview applicants on a walk-in basis at specific, posted times.  
  • The time it takes to process your visa also can vary significantly depending on type of visa and circumstances in the country or region.   Therefore it is important that you contact the closest U.S. Embassy or Consulate as soon as you know you need to travel to the U.S.
  • Policies and regulations worldwide will continue to change as new security measures are put into place. Visit www.UnitedStatesVisas.gov on a regular basis for updates and changes that could affect your travel plans.

 

For a list of Web sites of U.S. embassies and consulates worldwide, and for comprehensive information about U.S. visa policies and procedures, please visit www.UnitedStatesVisas.gov.

 

Entering the United States

US-VISIT is a top priority for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security because it enhances security for our citizens and visitors while facilitating legitimate travel and trade across our borders.  US-VISIT helps to secure our borders, facilitate the entry and exit process, and enhance the integrity of the immigration system while respecting the privacy of our visitors.  

US-VISIT is part of a continuum of security measures that begins overseas and continues through a visitor's arrival to and departure from the United States.  It incorporates eligibility determinations made by both the Departments of Homeland Security and State.  

In those cases where a visa is issued by the Department of State, biometrics such as digital, inkless fingerscans and digital photographs allow the Department of Homeland Security to determine whether the person applying for entry to the United States is the same person who was issued the visa by the Department of State.  Additionally, the biometric and biographic data are checked against watchlists, improving the Department of Homeland Security's ability to make admissibility decisions as well as the Department of State's ability to make visa determinations.

US-VISIT currently applies to all visitors (with limited exemptions) holding non-immigrant visas, regardless of country of origin.  

By September 30, 2004, US-VISIT procedures will be expanded to include visitors traveling to the United States under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) arriving at air and sea ports of entry.

An extension is being sought to an October 26, 2004 deadline set in the Enhanced Border Security Act of 2002 for countries in the VWP to certify that they have programs in place to issue their nationals machine-readable passports that incorporate biometric identifiers that comply with standards established by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). According to the mandate, any passport issued on or after October 26, 2004, must be an ICAO-compliant travel document that uses biometrics, if the bearer applies for admission into the United States under the VWP.   Due to technical challenges, few countries will be able to meet that October 26, 2004 deadline. Therefore, a two-year extension is being requested to make it possible for countries to comply with this mandate.    

On August 9, 2004 President Bush signed H.R. 4417, which extends the deadline by which new passports issued must be biometrically enabled for one year, to October 26, 2005.

Entry Procedures

  • Many of the entry procedures in place today at air and seaports remain unchanged and are familiar to international visitors.  When a visitor arrives through an air or seaport, they are enrolled in US-VISIT as part of the primary inspection process.  Once land border processing is operational, if the visitor arrives with a visa through a land border they will be enrolled in US-VISIT at the secondary inspection area. (This does not initially apply to those Mexicans who use their Border Crossing Cards for trips under 72 hours and within the 25-mile border zone.)
  • The new, inkless digital "fingerscanner" is easy to use.  Visitors first put the left index finger, then the right index finger on a glass plate that electronically captures their fingerscans.
  • Visitors will also look into a camera and their digital picture will be taken.  
  • U.S. Customs and Border Protection Officers will review travel documents and ask questions about the visitor's stay in the United States.
  • The biometric enhancements to the entry procedures add minimal time to the process -- an average of 15 seconds in most cases.
  • Biometric identifiers also protect our visitors by making it virtually impossible for anyone else to claim their identity should their biometrically-enhanced travel documents (such as a visa) be stolen or duplicated.

For more information go to http://www.dhs.gov/ and
http://travel.state.gov/visa/temp/temp_1305.html


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Global Entry Program

CPB Global Entry Allows Travelers To Expedite Entry Into U.S.
U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has created A Global Entry membership, allowing international travelers to get on their way quickly and easily by using automated kiosks when entering the United States. The kiosks are located at most major U.S. airports. Details of the program can be viewed by downloading this brochure. Learn more.

 

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Invitation Letter

If you are traveling to the symposium from outside the United States, and you need a letter of invitation in order to do so, please indicate on your registration form. Once SABCS has received your paid registration an invitation letter will be mailed to the address that you provide.

In order to consider your request we must receive a valid registration and payment in full.

For more information about International Travelers Click here.

 

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Rich Markow, Director, Symposia
Cancer Therapy & Research Center at UT Health Science Center San Antonio

7979 Wurzbach Road, MC 8224 San Antonio, TX 78229 USA
Phone: 210-450-1550    Fax: 210-450-1560    Email: sabcs@uthscsa.edu
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